Construction Notes

 

Decorative Arbors...

an integral part of our overall site design, were included on our building permit and considered a priority in warming up our otherwise steely building. One large arbor will provide shelter and atmosphere for outdoor seating just off the front entrance of the winery. Two smaller arbors positioned along each steel side will host welcoming vines.

This do-it-yourself portion was begun in late March of 2010. Concrete piers were poured with anchor bolts. Then metal brackets fastened pressure-treated posts to the piers. One arbor serves a dual purpose as it supports the control panels for the dosing tank and blower of our septic system.

 

It took every ladder...

apparently, in our possession to engineer the bracing on the front entrance overhang. We even borrowed a taller step ladder from a neighbor when we stained the cedar lumber. The metal roofing panels match the garage and house. So shiny and rich in color this rectangle looks like a giant chocolate bar!

 

 

The vineyard entrance...

features a vertical lift garage door that preserves valuable space inside. Deliveries of bottles and other supplies will be made through this service entrance. Grapes harvested from our vineyard will be crushed in this area.

         

Space was tight...

in many ways when planning our septic system. We had already used the most appropriate spot on the 10 acre property for the residence septic system installed in 1992. The winery facility needed positioned on favorably high ground. For two years, septic designers struggled with several layouts trying to utilize the suitable soils and situations still available for the commercial septic system.

The final solution required a grease trap, a pretreatment digestion tank and dosing tank. A narrow space was found for the tanks on the east side of the building. The photo shows the placement of the third tank that will pump a good distance west of the building to an area that slopes appropriately.

Because of dense trees...

a field of irrigation tubing created a smaller footprint and caused less root damage than a conventional finger system. Two mature trees were removed from the area and many more had their feet tickled by the big equipment. Irrigation tubing with built-in emitters is pulled through slits in the soil made at prescribed intervals. A 6-inch perimeter drain surrounds the field. Pretreated effluent is dispersed to the tubing from manifold pipes on the south side of the field.

         

   
         
         
         

 

 

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